Tag: "enphase energy"

05/31/19

  08:20:00 pm, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 211 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Residential Solar, Energy Storage

Enphase Releases Video on IQ8 and Ensemble

Our friends over at Enphase have posted a video to YouTube explaining in non-technical terms what the IQ8 will do for solar consumers, both in the developing world, and here at home.  Here’s the video and some quick thoughts about it.

To quote the video, “Isn’t it cool?"  Well yes, as we’ve been saying for quite some time here, this is waaaay cool.  But here are some other takeaways from the video:

  • Strong endorsement for interoperability with the IQ6’s and IQ7’s that we have been installing for the past year and a half.  But no word about how this will work with earlier versions.
  • The Enpower switch - which is needed to legally isolate you from the grid - is pictured, but still no details.
  • A hint at pricing would be nice!

As far as I’m aware, this is the first, general-public-facing details about the IQ8 and Ensemble that Enphase has released.  It went live on May 28, and three days later is sitting on just under 15,000 views, with 154 up-votes to 6 down-votes.  (What is there to down vote?  Gee, SEDG, troll much?)

This will be very cool technology for our clients, but it will truly be life-changing for folks in the developing world or any place where the grid is unreliable.

Watch this space.

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04/03/19

  09:14:00 pm, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 1625 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Residential Solar, Ranting, Energy Storage

Enphase IQ8 Update... UPDATED

UPDATE - We got a message back from Enphase about a viable approach to the whole-house connection issue discussed below.  


The end of March found me in San Diego attending the annual NABCEP Continuing Education Conference.  As part of being NABCEP certified, I am required to recertify every three years, and my third recertification occurs this year.  The Conference is a convenient way to earn the credit hours needed as part of the recertification process. 

While much of that is bone dry (such as a full day talking about the most recent changes to the National Electrical Code, made tolerable only by the wit of the presenter, Ryan Mayfield), or surprisingly cool (such as our discovery of Scanifly), nothing was more anticipated than our chance to attend a talk presented by Enphase titled, “Design and Specification of Grid-Agnostic Enphase Ensemble™ based Systems."  (Enphase describes the Ensemble system as being “grid-agnostic” because it is intended to switch seamlessly between grid connected and grid isolated operation.) Here is our take…

The room for this talk, as was the case with a number of talks, was way too small for the number of interested participants.  I arrived early and was rewarded with a seat.  Late arrivals were SRO.  The talk was presented by Peter Lum, with an assist from Field Applications Engineer, Nathan Charles. 

Key Takeaways

For folks looking for just the highlights, here are some (in no particular order):

  1. Initial rollout of the IQ8 in the U.S. will be as part of the Encharge energy storage system
  2. Encharge will come in two basic flavors, a 3.3 kWh, 1.28 kW unit, and a 10 kWh, 3.8 kW - both with a peak surge output of 150% rated power for one second
  3. The 3.3 kWh unit will be 24″ high, 13″ wide, and 12″ deep, weighing 88 lbs, mountable either on the floor or the wall, and it can be mounted outdoors
  4. Cells are LFP, cooling is passive, and comms are - surprise - Zigbee
  5. The 3.3 kWh unit has four IQ8 microinverters inside, that are field replaceable should one fail
  6. The battery cells are not tied to any one microinverter; if a microinverter fails the storage capacity is unaffected, but peak output power is diminished
  7. Warranty will be for 4,000 cycles (100% DoD) or 10 years, whichever comes first
  8. For a microgrid to form, there must be roughly the same amount of IQ8 power as there is IQ6 or IQ7 power in the system
  9. Not compatible with M-series microinverters, “at launch”
  10. No word yet on pricing, anticipated deliveries to begin Q4

A Little More Depth

So those are some highlights, let’s talk about some details. The smarts inside the IQ8 is an Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) with some 5 million gates. As a result, the IQ8 is able to update its control vectors every 20 ns.  Thus, the individual IQ8 provides the primary control over the microgrid, and there is no master/slave relationship.  However, the IQ6 and IQ7 do not have that level of independent control functionality, and so they rely on secondary control, via the Envoy, to stay in sync with the microgrid.

As with its other IQ cousins, the IQ8 is a bi-directional inverter, meaning the same device that can be in an array, converting DC to AC, can be in the battery, converting AC to DC to charge the cells.

Keying off the 2017 NEC (which California will adopt come January), we were introduced to a new acronym: MID - which stands for Microgrid Interconnect Device, and is defined as, “A device that allows a microgrid system to separate from and reconnect to a primary power source.” (705.2)  The Enphase MID is referred to as Enpower, and it essentially has three components: an automatic transfer switch, a neutral forming transformer (recall that the IQ series just uses the two hots, L1 and L2, so the NFT is necessary to power 120 volt loads when off grid), and a control device.  Comms are - you guessed it - Zigbee.

Use Cases

There are two primary use cases for the new Encharge component, Energy Optimization, and Storage with Backup.  Let’s look at each one in turn.

Energy Optimization

Energy optimization, or more to the point, Time-of-Use arbitrage, involves storing energy during the peak production portion of the day (instead of exporting it to the grid) and using it later in the day for local consumption.  This becomes important as utilities - think SCE - switch to TOU rates where energy in the middle of the day is significantly cheaper than energy during the peak TOU period (more and more, something like 4-9 p.m.). 

Our friends over at Energy Toolbase just blogged about, “A Historic Moment for Residential Energy Storage Economics: California’s new Time-of-Use Rates,” noting that for the first time it was possible to model a more economically advantageous system adding storage, than just solar alone.  Which means that the Energy Optimization use case may pencil out on its own - though that is hard to say for sure until we have some actual pricing!

Enphase provided the following illustration (sorry for the lousy images, taken from the side with my phone!). You can click on the image to see a larger version.  

 energy optimization

On the far left is the Encharge 3.3 kWh storage system showing the four IQ8’s.  To the right is an array built on an equal number of IQ7 microinverters - but note well, this is not a microgrid configuration.  Why?   Because it doesn’t have a MID, and per the 2017 NEC, you can’t have a grid-agnostic microgrid without a MID. 

In the middle is the latest version of the IQ combiner box.  (We just installed one of these and frankly, I’m not a big fan.  The wiring for consumption CTs requires you to cross reference an unmarked connection block to the lid for the wiring diagram.  This is going to be error prone, IMHO.  Also the Envoy has been reduced to just a circuit board w/out its own case.  Ok, it’s in a NEMA 4 box so the case is probably not needed, but if you are trying to operate it with the deadfront off (say during testing), you need to watch where you put your fingers!  A false economy here, I’d say.)  

Note the green boxes which denote updated software both in the cloud and in the Envoy.  Also, the Envoy picks up a Zigbee device (to communicate with Encharge) to be attached to one of the two USB ports on the Envoy.  (As we noted before, Zigbee is built into Encharge, though not called out on this slide.

This is super easy to set up as the Encharge just lands on one of the breakers in the IQ combiner.  And while it may - assuming our friends at ET are correct - pencil out, it isn’t what all the buzz has been about, so let’s turn to that use case, shall we?

Storage with Backup

Ever since I made my pilgrimage to Petaluma last summer, the amazing microgrid has been the feature that everyone is eager to see.  The good news is, we are closer!  The bad news is, this isn’t going to be as easy as we had hoped.  So here is the key diagram from last week:
Encharge for backup

There is really only one change from the prior diagram and that is in the upper right hand corner, where the Enphase MID - dubbed the Enpower 200G, has been added.  The switch is rated at 200 A (that is the significance of the 200, G stands for grid), and in theory could be an all home setup.  In a grid outage, the Enpower ATF switches and the microgrid forms - automagically.  Depending on the actual array and storage configuration deployed, will determine how much of the house loads could actually be powered here. 

There is one fly in the ointment in this illustration.  In many parts of the country, the utility meter is mounted outdoors and the distribution panel - the Main Load Center in the slide - is located indoors.  In such a scenario, the Enpower MID could be wired in between those two components with minimal disruption or cost.

Alas, in California, at least in Southern California, that is not how we do things.  99.9% of the services that I have ever looked at consisted of a combination meter and load center “all-in-one".  The rub here is that there is no easy way to physically interconnect the Enpower device between the meter and the load center.  When pressed on that issue, Enphase - accurately, if not helpfully - pointed out that we would have the same problem with any such storage solution and the combo meter/load centers.  True enough, but we have been talking about this product for a long time now, and you would like to think that they would have a clean solution in mind as to how to make this work by now.

UPDATE: I spoke with Enphase Field Applications Engineer Nick Dadikozian about the following possible solution.  Assuming that the utility and the AHJ go along, you could add a separate meter socket and wire the line side to the service, with the load side of the socket connecting to the line side of the Enpower MID, and the load side of the MID to the load side of the meter socket in the combo panel, or if no way to do that, wire to the line side of the combo meter socket and install appropriately rated jumpers in lieu of the relocated meter. 

Of course, another approach is to have a critical loads subpanel, with a breaker on the main panel and the Enpower in between.  That, I suspect, will be the approach most commonly taken.

So there you have it – all that I could absorb from our relatively short session, and some follow-on conversations with Peter over the next couple of days.  (My thanks to him for his patience in dealing with my myriad questions.)

Eager to hear your thoughts on how you will be using this system.

08/11/17

  11:01:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 390 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Ranting

Court to SolarEdge: DENIED!

Judge bangs gavel on SolarEdge's claimsWe wrote last month about the ill-conceived lawsuit filed by SolarEdge against Enphase Energy over a video comparing the new Enphase AC Module’s install time with that of systems using the SolarEdge optimizers.  SolarEdge initially asked for a Temporary Restraining Order - which was denied, but the court set an accelerated hearing schedule for a Preliminary Injunction.  If granted, Enphase would  have been prohibited from airing the video - either via YouTube or at next month’s SPI trade show.

Well this just in: SolarEdge’s motion has been denied in full.  (You can read the court’s order here.)

SolarEdge had whined in their complaint that the video wasn’t fair because they too have embedded optimizers, and that is the comparison that should be shown.  But that is just silly.  First of all, the ad isn’t aimed at consumers, it is aimed at installers - and they very well know the difference.  (A point the judge noted as well.)  Furthermore, here at Run on Sun, we are exclusively an LG shop when it comes to our solar modules.  SolarEdge doesn’t have an embedded optimizer with LG - but Enphase has an AC Module built on the LG 330 Watt Neon module!  For us, the comparison in the video is exactly the comparison that matters.

SolarEdge also whined about the use of their logo in the video, but that was equally bogus.  No one looking at the ad would think for a moment that SolarEdge was endorsing the Enphase product.  Rather the video makes it clear that Enphase is only using it to identify the competing product, a “nominative fair use” that can be invoked where “the use of the trademark does not attempt to capitalize on consumer confusion or to appropriate the cachet of one product for a different… and where a defendant uses the mark to refer to the trademarked good itself."  That is precisely what was done here.

In finding that SolarEdge was unlikely to succeed on the merits of their claims the court cleared the way for Enphase to promote their video far and wide.  We are happy to help!  In case you missed it before, here’s the video that SolarEdge tried, but failed, to keep you from seeing:

PS: Note to SolarEdge’s lawyers - from my old firm of OM&M - you really need to do a better job of managing your client!  Just sayin!

07/31/17

  08:42:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 494 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Ranting

SE Takes the Leap, Highlighting Enphase's Superior Product - UPDATE!

UPDATE: The court has denied SolarEdge’s motion - read about it here.

In an earlier life I was a big firm lawyer, mostly handling hi-tech and intellectual property litigation.  Every now and then a client would get steamed over what they thought a competitor was doing, and would demand that we sue them - even though there was no merit in the case.  The competitor had a legal right to do what they were doing, even if it annoyed our client. 

Calmly, we would try to talk them down off the ledge less they draw more attention to the issue by suing than the activity ever would have on its own.  Apparently the folks at SolarEdge never got such advice as they have filed a frivolous lawsuit against competitor Enphase Energy over the video below.  Here’s our take…

SE is complaining that this video is “false and misleading” since it doesn’t illustrate the installation comparison that SE thinks is proper.  But that isn’t the standard.  Enphase says that they are comparing the install time on the roof between an Enphase-LG AC module and a SE optimizer system with separate modules.  Does that comparison exist in the real world of solar installations?  Of course.  In fact, if a solar installer wanted to use LG modules with SE, this is exactly the comparison that would be at issue! To suggest that such a comparison is false and misleading is to simply ignore real-world conditions. 

If SE wants to highlight a different, equally factual comparison, they are free to produce that ad, but that doesn’t give them the right to enjoin the factually accurate comparison that Enphase chose to highlight.

(SE also complains about the use of their logo in the video, but this is equally frivolous - that would be like saying that you couldn’t show a Pepsi can in a Coke ad.  Good luck with that.)

So far the court has not been too impressed with SE’s claim, denying a motion for a Temporary Restraining Order ("TRO"), saying:

Preliminary injunctive relief, whether in the form of a temporary restraining order or a preliminary injunction, is an “extraordinary and drastic remedy,” that is never awarded as of right.  In order to obtain such relief, a plaintiff must establish four factors: (1) he is likely to succeed on the merits; (2) he is likely to suffer irreparable harm in the absence of  preliminary relief; (3) the balance of equities tips in his favor; and (4) an injunction is in the public interest.
Here, with respect to the request for a temporary restraining order in advance of a hearing for a preliminary injunction, plaintiffs have wholly failed to establish a likelihood of immediate irreparable harm to justify the issuance of a temporary restraining order at this time.

Apparently SE is afraid that Enphase will show the ad during SPI.  But thanks to this ill-begotten lawsuit, probably everyone who would have seen it at SPI, will see it now!  Way to take the leap, SE, nicely done.

09/26/16

  10:51:00 am, by Laurel Hamilton   , 1615 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power

Solar Power International 2016: Industry Latest and Greatest

Every September we pack our bags and head to the largest solar conference and exposition in the country; Solar Power International. This is when we get to connect with the broader solar community, advocates, and friends working far and wide for the betterment of the world through distributed clean energy. It is also the time when manufacturers unveil their latest technologies. These technology improvements come fast and furious in an attempt to stay ahead of the curve in a competitive industry. Just two years ago when I started working with Run on Sun we were able to get 270 watt panels from LG. What is coming from them in the next year will blow your mind. Here is my run down of the top take aways from SPI 2016…

Panel: “Survival of the Fittest, the Future of Residential Solar”

Some of you may have seen the three part series Run on Sun’s CEO, Jim Jenal, wrote recently about what we need to do to be sustainable as an industry facing a crisis of increasingly shoddy workmanship and shady business practices. As part of the convention’s educational program, Jim was invited to participate on a panel of solar professionals to discuss the future of residential solar. The panel consisted of a wide range of backgrounds including a representative from a national company, Sunrun’s Michael Grasso, Rick Luna from a municipal utility CPS Energy, Ed Murray from a medium sized company, Aztec Solar, as well as national advocacy group SEIA, and Jim representing the small installer at Run on Sun. 

The panelists discussed their take on who will dominate the residential solar space and what will the predominant business model be in five years. This was a perfect platform to raise the very real issues of quality facing the industry and Jim did not disappoint! Of course Sunrun’s Grasso asserted that national scale companies continuing the leasing model with storage will dominate in the future. But there were many nods of agreement in the audience when Jim insisted that the current status quo is not sustainable. Giant publicly traded national companies operating in the red and pushing customers into bad deals are going to cause a backlash. We’ve already seen many law suits and bankruptcies in the industry. Solar City’s Better Business Bureau rating in the Bay area is an embarrassing 80% negative. The notion that Ed Murray, from SEIA, put forth that the market will naturally take care of the bad companies is just not a sustainable way forward or an ethical one. As more and more consumers get hit with bad contracts and solar systems, the market will be left with a bad taste for solar. The people in this industry who are doing it for the right reasons, aiming to help people save money and reduce their impact on the ecosystem need to demand that there is more oversight over the quality of systems and some legal standards around contracts.

Jim’s comments seemed to be well received in the audience as most people attending were people who work in solar for the right reasons given they are investing in the hefty price-tag to attend the convention. But the disparate opinions on the panel itself was interesting to say the least. I don’t know if the reps for big companies are just out of touch with what is happening on the ground or if they are in denial. 

Everyone agreed that a future will include storage or other bundled options for improving home efficiencies. However, Jim noted that storage needs to be presented to clients in a transparent way so they understand the true value of storage and whether it makes sense for them or not. If you are on a tiered rate system with no demand charges there likely is no value in storage. Solar stakeholders from advocates to installers need be fostering business practices that focus on transparent education for consumers instead of just closing every sell if we are to survive as an industry and continue to grow solar as the incredibly valuable resource that it is. 

 

LG Solar Panels Up the Ante 

We have been installing exclusively LG panels since 2012. Why? We believe LG panels are the best for our clients for two main reasons. 1. As a diversified company we, and our clients, can rely upon them to stick around to back their 25 year warranty no matter what happens in the wider solar industry. And 2. LG has an incredible R&D department churning out ground-breaking improvements keeping them at the top in both quality and output year after year. 

Last year LG announced 320 watt panels would be coming and we were fortunate to be one of the first to install these at a beautiful home in Altadena last Spring. This year they have several incredible new announcements:

  1. LG 355 Black on BlackNeon R Panels: This latest generation of LG panels has incorporated rear contacts, so no wire lines showing on the front of the panel. They displayed an impressive 365 watt panel slated to be released in Q1 of 2017! The “R” will also be available with a black backsheet and a 355 watt output capability. With rear contacts and a black backsheet the panel has a seamless sleek look like no other! (see pic)
  2. AC Modules: LG is partnering with Enphase Energy to incorporate Enphase’s newest generation of microinverter into the panel itself, creating an AC solar panel. Panels convert sunlight into direct current (DC), then that current must be converted into alternating current (AC) using an inverter. With the inverter directly on the panel, this will simplify things on the roof a great deal. As the majority of our projects are with Enphase microinverters and LG panels, this is a match made in heaven!  
  3. Bi-Facial Panels: Bi-facial panels have no back sheet, allowing reflected light to hit the panel from underneath when installed above a light surface adding to the output capacity of the panel. They had these on an impressive display showing up to 40% more output than a standard panel with a backsheet. There has been a limited market for bi-facial panels historically. Sometimes you see them on shade structures, but the price point is higher than standard panels. These new LG panels are in a commercial 72-cell format so they are aiming to capture commercial projects that can really bank that extra output capacity. 

 

Enphase Energy Total Rethink

Enphase MicroThe Enphase booth was seriously hoppin’ throughout the expo! Unsurprisingly with a total redesign of their system from the microinverter to the cable and even a special junction box.

  1. IQ 6 Micro:The new system, called IQ, includes the same microinverter guts with a new, double-insulated, polycarbonate case eliminating the need for a ground wire and cutting down significantly on weight and cost. The new IQ inverters will pair with a broader range of panels including 60-cell and 72-cell commercial panels as well as up to 400 watt panels.  
  2. Cable: The new cabling will be lighter and cheaper as well because they are carrying 2 wires compared to the current cable carrying 4 wires. They eliminated the need for a neutral for communications as they will now communicate on the same lines that the energy is transported. They also eliminated the need for a ground wire due to the new polycarbonate case.  
  3. Smart Junction: Lastly they rolled out a junction box wired up for easy installation between the string of panels and the run to the electrical service. 

All of these improvements come together to create a system that includes the microinverters we know and trust at a lower cost with a simpler and quicker installation. 

 

Everest Solar Racking Shares at SPI

EverestThe large majority of Run on Sun’s solar installations are being held together by the great racking products from Everest. This is because their materials are the most solid and well thought out racking product for standard pitched roofs on the market today. Their booth at SPI included a new “shared rail system” which allows two panels to come together on a single rail cutting down on the total number of rails needed for an installation. This system incorporates the same beefy product we trust with a reduced overall cost and installation time on the roof. It also doesn’t hurt that the entire team at Everest Solar Systems are great people and local to SoCal too! 

 

Edisun Dual Axis Tracker - PV Booster

Idealab tracker

Pasadena’s Idealab, an incubator, has been consulting with Jim on a revolutionary new product - the PV Booster - at their start up Edisun. They unveiled their dual axis tracker system at SPI. The system is designed for large flat roofs (and even carports) and potentially can increase output by up to 40% by tracking the sun throughout the day.

We were excited to see the system on display as they have developed quite a bit over the last six months of consulting with Jim. There was a lot of interest in the system at the show and we hope to help move their vision forward by installing some projects using their system locally here in Pasadena in the coming year. 

 

A Solar Wedding

SPIdoEvery year Run on Sun participates in Solar Fred’s Tweetup. It has become an event of close friends and allies. This year was a very special Tweetup as mainstays Pam Cargill and Martin Hamon got hitched in a truly extraordinary ceremony! Pam was walked down the “aisle” by a mascot Sun to the tune of “Here Comes the Sun". The ceremony included as many solar-love metaphors and quips as possible as Reverend Solar Fred officiated. Apologies for my blurry photo but it really was an event to remember. If you have pics to share with the happy couple you can share them on their dropbox here and relive the moment on Twitter with #SPIdo. 

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Jim Jenal is the Founder & CEO of Run on Sun, Pasadena's premier installer and integrator of top-of-the-line solar power installations.
Run on Sun also offers solar consulting services, working with consumers, utilities, and municipalities to help them make solar power affordable and reliable.

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