Category: SCE


  12:21:00 pm, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 407 words  
Categories: SEIA, SCE, Ranting, Net Metering, Chandler School

Solar Thankfulness - 2015

Giving thanks - 2015When you are fortunate enough to work in the Solar Industry you really should be thankful everyday.  After all, we are a part of doing something wonderfully important at work, and how many people can honestly say that?  We provide genuine value to our clients by bringing them clean, affordable solar energy, and we get to make our living at the same time – pretty cool!

But with the holidays upon us, starting with Thanksgiving tomorrow, we wanted to take a look back on this year and highlight some of the things for which we are especially thankful, today and all year around. 
So, in no particular order, here is our list for 2015…

Of course, at the end of the day, it is all of our clients for whom we are the most thankful! From the first to the latest, from the smallest to the largest, and everyone in between - you are why we do what we do, and we never for a moment take for granted the trust you have placed in us. 

May your holidays be filled with peace and joy and love!


  08:43:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 441 words  
Categories: Solar Economics, SCE, Residential Solar, Ranting

Support Solar!

Regular readers of this blog will know that solar-friendly policies are under constant attach by the utilities, especially the three Investor-owned utilities (or IOUs as they are known), PG&E, SDG&E and our own SCE.  Well they are at it again, with rate proposals before the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) that could harm both solar and energy efficiency measures alike.  Fortunately, we have an opportunity to have our say - here’s our take. (H/t our friends at CalSEIA.)

Support SolarCurrent policies in California, most notably net metering, along with a tiered rate structure (whereby you pay more for electricity as you use more) have provided powerful incentives not only for consumers to install solar, but to also take proactive measures to reduce their energy consumption.  As a result, energy use in California over the past twenty years has grown slower than the growth in population despite the explosion of new electronic devices in homes and businesses during that time.  Indeed, California has lead the way for the rest of the Nation, proving that you can have a twenty-first century lifestyle and still reduce your energy demand.

In other words, these policies have been a success.

The proposals being floated at the CPUC would change rates throughout the three IOU service areas (i.e., much of California) and threaten that success.  In particular, they are seeking to add a flat, monthly fee to everyone of $10 to all bills, regardless of use and to reduce the number of tiers from four to two.  In addition, the rate for the lowest tier would increase, making this a double-whammy not just to solar owners, but to the poorest electric customers who will see a rise in their rates.  (So much for the utilities’ concern over hurting the poor!)

Fortunately these changes are not yet cast in stone and the public, particularly advocates for solar and energy efficiency, have a chance to have their voices heard.  The CPUC is holding a series of public hearings, some in the Run on Sun service area, as well as others around the state.  Here are the upcoming hearings:


September 29, 2014

2:00 pm & 6:30 pm

Fontana City Council Chambers
8353 Sierra Avenue
Fontana, CA 92335


September 30, 2014

2:00 pm & 6:30 pm?

Temple City Council Chambers
5938 Kauffman Avenue
Temple City, CA  91780


October 2, 2014

2:00 pm & 6:30 pm

Palmdale City Council Chambers
38300 Sierra Hwy, Suite A
Palmdale, CA  93550


October 9, 2014

2:00 pm & 6:30 pm

Holiday Inn Chico – Conference Center
685 Manzanita Ct.
Chico, CA 95926


October 14, 2014

2:00 pm & 6:30 pm

Fresno City Council Chambers
2600 Fresno Street
Fresno, CA  93721

We are planning on attending the hearing in Temple City.  If you attend one of these important hearings, please let us know about your experience in the comments.


  08:44:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 673 words  
Categories: SCE, Commercial Solar

SCE Spikes GS-1, GS-2 Rates

Yesterday we wrote about how SCE’s residential customers who take service under the Domestic rate structure could see their bills rise by 12% or more starting with their June bills, and we warned commercial customers not to get complacent about their own bills.  Today we drop the other shoe: GS-1 and GS-2 customers, the bad news starts now.

GS-1 and GS-2 Explained

SCE’s commercial customers (what it refers to as general service, hence the “GS") are largely divided into two groups: those that pay only for monthly energy usage (GS-1) and those that pay for both usage and peak power demand charges (GS-2).  You can use all the energy you want in a month, but as long as your peak power demand never exceeds 20 kW you will stay in GS-1.  Once your demand sneaks past 20 kW however, you will be assigned to paying higher bills under GS-2.

Solar for GS-1 users is a no brainer, just as it now is for SCE’s residential customers.  For GS-2 customers, however, the question is a tougher call since it can be very hard to know how well solar will coincide with a potential client’s peak power demands, and it is those demand charges that so drive the pain of GS-2 bills.  Neither GS-1 nor GS-2 are tiered, meaning that every kWh of energy is charged the same.  Under GS-2, however, demand charges are significantly higher during the summer than they are the rest of the year.

We have a cool simulator (based on the old rates) that shows how your actual usage drives the difference between GS-1 and GS-2 rates.


We said that you could use all of the energy you like and remain in GS-1 but that’s not strictly true—if your peak power demand stays below 20 kW you can only pull so much energy into your site. Let’s imagine a commercial entity that is right under that limit: say 19 kW peak demand and they sustain that demand for 10 hours a day, every day. The remaining 14 hours their demand drops to just 5 kW. Their daily usage averages:

Usage = 10*19 + 14*5 = 190 + 70 = 260 kWh/day.

Under the old rate, this maxed-out GS-1 customer would have seen a bill of $15,355 or roughly 16.2¢/kWh. (A bargain, by the way, compared to what a residential customer using that much energy would have paid.)

Under the new rate, their bill jumps to $16,777 an increase of 9.26%, and now they are paying 17.7¢/kWh.


We recently provided a proposal to a potential GS-2 client, so we will model their usage to demonstrate what the new rates will do to a GS-2 customer’s bill.  Their usage has peak demands that average 119 kW per year, but spike as high as 167 kW during the summer.  Their daily energy usage is substantial as well, ranging between 600 and nearly 1,000 kWh per day from winter to summer.

Under the old rates, they were paying some $56,873 or 21.73¢/kWh.  The new rates will see their bill climb to $59,598, and increase of 4.79%, averaging 22.77¢/kWh.

But here’s the interesting thing about the new GS-2 rate: it is actually more beneficial to solar customers, since the increase is mostly in the per kWh charge.  Indeed, when we model our potential client’s savings in Year 1 under the new rate as compared to the old, it increases by over $1,000—going from $14,808 to $15,818, a 6.8% savings increase for no additional out-of-pocket expense!  Their payback now occurs in Year 6 instead of Year 7, their IRR increases from 12.2% to 12.9% and they will have saved an additional $12,000 in Year 10 than they would have under the old rates. (Combine the solar power system with intelligent storage and you are really on to something.)

Bottom Line

SCE’s rates are going up for all classes of customers that we see: residential (12%+), small commercial (9%), and large commercial (4.8%).  Solar can help all of these customer classes, and GS-2 customers can see an even greater savings from solar under the new rates than they could before.  Oh, and SCE still has some rebate money for commercial projects, but that won’t last for long.

Stop suffering, start saving—make this the summer you go solar.


  07:50:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 620 words  
Categories: Solar Economics, SCE, Commercial Solar, Residential Solar

Just in time for Summer - SCE Jacks its Rates

One of our astute readers contacted us to ask if we had noticed that SCE had just increased their rates—and dramatically.  That got our attention so we decided to spend some quality time amidst SCE’s tariffs.  The news is mixed: terrible news for people who are going to have to pay these crazy rates, but great news for everyone who can install solar.  In fact, SCE’s new domestic rate is about all anyone would need to be convinced to finally make the switch to solar.

SCE’s Tariff Library

In case you did not know it, every SCE tariff—that is, the rate structures under which they bill their customers such as the Domestic tariff for most residential customers or GS-1 and GS-2 for most commercial customers—can be found on their website.  If you know where to look.  (Hint: look here!)  Of course, when you do find what you are looking for, you are rewarded with something that looks like this:

Part of SCE's Domestic rate

This is one half of SCE’s Domestic rate (the delivery portion)—and this is about the simplest rate structure that they use! So it is not surprising that most normal people don’t really examine these things to see what is going on—they just groan and pay the bill.

But we suspect people will do more than groan when they look at their bills this summer.

Cruel, cruel Summer

We had been working on a solar proposal for a prospective client in SCE territory when we learned about the rate change.  The client’s usage was relatively high, averaging 55 kWh/day over the course of the year; high, but still far lower than some of our clients.  Under the rate structure in effect prior to June 1, this client’s annual bill worked out to $5,100 but after applying the new rates her annual total jumped to $5,750—an increase of a whopping 12.7%!

We will pause a moment to let that sink in.

What about that other potential client we wrote about, the one whose SCE bill already contained an incredibly misleading chart purporting to help her understand her bill.  What impact will these new rates have for her?  Under the rates in place before June 1, her total bill for the year was an already eye-popping $8,435—ouch!  But under the new rates? Her new bill becomes $9,560—an increase of 13.4%!

So what is actually going on here?  Turns out that the rates on the high end, Tiers 3 and 4, are the culprits, increasing by 16.4% and 14.8% respectively.  Live in Tier 4 this summer and you will be paying 34.8¢/kWh for the privilege!

Silver Lining

There is a silver lining here and that is that adding solar pays off better than ever.  If your solar power system gets you out of Tier 4 alone, you will save thousands of dollars a year.  For our prospective client who averaged 55 kWh per day, her savings come to $4,171 in Year 1.  Even without a rebate from SCE (which for now at least has gone the way of the Dodo), her payback is in Year 5!  After 10 years, thanks to these new rates, she will have saved an additional $25,000!  And by avoiding a lease (this client is planning on using HERO financing), those benefits all go to her!

We have said it before and we will say it again: utility rates are only going up.  While this example pertains to just SCE’s residential customers, guess what? You commercial customers are about to see your rates go up as well (more on that soon).  And muni customers, now is not really the time to feel smug as your rates are going up too (and yes, PWP folks, we mean you!).

Give us a call and let’s see if we can’t help—contrary to the song, we’ve got a cure for these summertime blues!


  09:26:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 654 words  
Categories: SCE, Residential Solar, Ranting

SCE Explains Your Bill - Not!

We have looked at a lot of electric bills.

Pretty much every potential client that we speak to sends us a year’s worth of their electric bills as the first step in the process of getting a proposal for adding solar to their home or business.  We use that data to model what your actual savings will be, based on the rate structure that the utility applies to you as their customer.  Some of those rate structures are really complicated (like this time-of-use rate for EV charging), but for most residential clients, the rate should be relatively straight forward.  After all, you are only paying for total usage (not demand charges) and most folks aren’t yet on a time-of-use rate.  How complicated can it be?

But we had a bit of an epiphany the other day as we tried to explain an SCE bill to a couple at their kitchen table.  Perhaps you’ve noticed this little chart if you are an SCE customer:

SCE's idea of helping you understand your bill!

Presumably this is SCE’s attempt in helping you to understand your bill.  So what is going on here?  SCE residential customers are under a tiered rate structure.  The lowest tier, the so-called baseline rate, is relatively cheap at roughly thirteen cents per kilowatt hour for the first few hundred kilowatt hours needed.  Of course, no one uses just their baseline allocation and so the second tier is a tiny slice that is 30% of the baseline.  If you stay in those first two tiers, congratulations, you are getting some pretty cheap energy.

Tier 3 is where things start to get pricey, with the cost per kilowatt hour doubling from what you paid for baseline.  Tier 3’s allocation is 70% of baseline, which mean that if you use more than twice your baseline allocation, you are out of Tier 3 and into the dreaded Tier 4 where you will pay more than 31¢/kWh. 

Ok, so far so good. But notice the odd thing that is going on in that graph.  The widths of Tiers 1-3 are actually proportionate to reality.  The width of the bar for Tier 1 is equal width to the sum of the bars for Tiers 2 & 3— which is exactly how the rate structure works.  But what is going on with that bar for Tier 4?  At a quick glance, you might think that you are using about the same amount of energy in Tier 4 as you did in Tier 1 (or Tiers 2 & 3).  But look at the number: whereas Tier 1 was 399 kWh, the usage in Tier 4 is more than four times that amount at 1,799 kWhs!  This client is living in Tier 4!

This is not only not helpful to “understanding your bill,” this is downright deceptive.

So what should this actually look like if drawn to scale?  How about this:

SCE's actual tier structure

Now the true impact of this client’s high energy usage starts to become clearer.  Their usage is dominated by Tier 4 but you never would have seen that relying on the chart provided by SCE.

Of course for most clients, they are more interested in what they are paying, and it is here that the real impact of SCE’s tiered rate structure comes home.  Check out this chart:

SCE's actual cost structure

Wow - this client is spending 10x as much on Tier 4 as they are on Tier 1!  That is some painful energy costs right there!

To be sure, if you review your bill carefully, you could find this same information, but the bill obscures the facts by parsing out the numbers in a manner that only makes sense to the lawyers who crafted the rate structure (and those of us who have made it our business to decipher them).

We have a suggestion to our friends at SCE—if you really want to help your customers understand their bills, start by ditching the misleading charts and replace them with a clear representation that makes the facts readily understandable.

In the meantime we will continue to do our part, one kitchen table at a time.

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Jim Jenal is the Founder & CEO of Run on Sun, Pasadena's premier installer and integrator of top-of-the-line solar power installations.
In addition, Run on Sun offers solar consulting services, working with consumers, utilities and municipalities to help them make solar power affordable and reliable.

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