Categories: All About Solar Power, Electric Cars that Run on Sun, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage, Safety

08/11/17

  11:01:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 390 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Ranting

Court to SolarEdge: DENIED!

Judge bangs gavel on SolarEdge's claimsWe wrote last month about the ill-conceived lawsuit filed by SolarEdge against Enphase Energy over a video comparing the new Enphase AC Module’s install time with that of systems using the SolarEdge optimizers.  SolarEdge initially asked for a Temporary Restraining Order - which was denied, but the court set an accelerated hearing schedule for a Preliminary Injunction.  If granted, Enphase would  have been prohibited from airing the video - either via YouTube or at next month’s SPI trade show.

Well this just in: SolarEdge’s motion has been denied in full.  (You can read the court’s order here.)

SolarEdge had whined in their complaint that the video wasn’t fair because they too have embedded optimizers, and that is the comparison that should be shown.  But that is just silly.  First of all, the ad isn’t aimed at consumers, it is aimed at installers - and they very well know the difference.  (A point the judge noted as well.)  Furthermore, here at Run on Sun, we are exclusively an LG shop when it comes to our solar modules.  SolarEdge doesn’t have an embedded optimizer with LG - but Enphase has an AC Module built on the LG 330 Watt Neon module!  For us, the comparison in the video is exactly the comparison that matters.

SolarEdge also whined about the use of their logo in the video, but that was equally bogus.  No one looking at the ad would think for a moment that SolarEdge was endorsing the Enphase product.  Rather the video makes it clear that Enphase is only using it to identify the competing product, a “nominative fair use” that can be invoked where “the use of the trademark does not attempt to capitalize on consumer confusion or to appropriate the cachet of one product for a different… and where a defendant uses the mark to refer to the trademarked good itself."  That is precisely what was done here.

In finding that SolarEdge was unlikely to succeed on the merits of their claims the court cleared the way for Enphase to promote their video far and wide.  We are happy to help!  In case you missed it before, here’s the video that SolarEdge tried, but failed, to keep you from seeing:

PS: Note to SolarEdge’s lawyers - from my old firm of OM&M - you really need to do a better job of managing your client!  Just sayin!

08/08/17

  11:23:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 354 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Solar Events

Let's not be Fuelish During the Eclipse!

Unless you’ve been living in a cave, you know that there is a total eclipse of the sun set to cross the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21st. This is a Really Big Deal as the next total eclipse to come to the U.S. won’t be until 2045!

Total solar eclipse

Baily’s Beads effect taken Dec. 4, 2002. Credit: Arne Danielson.

So there is a great deal of excitement around this event, but might there also be a “dark side"?  (Sorry, couldn’t resist the pun.)  Here’s our take…

The eclipse in California will not be total (unlike for our friend and former colleague, Laurel Hamilton, who is now up in Bend), with coverage ranging from roughly 76% in Northern California to 62% here in SoCal during the hours of roughly 9 to Noon.  But that will still have an impact on solar energy production in the state, and that could mean that the California Independent System Operator (CalISO) might have to rely on more fossil fuels during the two-plus hour eclipse window.

How big an impact will this have?  It is 10:30 as I write this and according to the CalISO website, at this moment, solar is producing 9,119 MW (at utility-scale plants - that total does not count rooftop solar) which amounts to 27% of the total load being served.  That means that on the 21st, solar production could be reduced by as much as 6,930 MW, leaving it up to gas-fired plants to fill that gap.  Unless…

Unless we find a way to cut our usage by a similar amount during that period.  Given that we are talking about an August day, that might be tough, but every bit helps.  That is why the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) has set up a pledge page to encourage Californians to take steps both before and during the eclipse to lower their demand.  (We just made our pledge - we are shutting off unneeded lights and the A/C during, and swapping out to more LEDs before.)

As of now, we are the 259th pledge to be made.  Let’s drive that number up, shall we? It’s easy, just click on the button below!

Take the Pledge!

08/06/17

  02:48:00 pm, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 165 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Climate Change

100 Years of Global Warming in 35 Seconds!

As regular readers of this blog know, we are major “data geeks” here at Run on Sun, and there is hardly anything that lights our fires more than a brilliantly executed data visualization!  Well Antti Lipponen, a researcher at the Finnish Meteorological Institute, has just published what may be one of the greatest data visualizations ever, demonstrating 100 years of global warming in a mesmerizing 35 seconds! (H/T Yale Environment 360.)

Check it out…

Using temperature data from the world’s 191 countries, Lipponen’s stunning video turns a boring dataset into a compelling image of the rapid change that we are experiencing.  Using both color (warmer temperatures appear in warmer colors) and height (the length of each country’s bar is its departure from the averaged baseline), you can almost feel the pulse of the ever-warming Earth.

This visualization brings vividly home that we have a lot of work ahead of us, and such is the power of data used properly.  Congratulations, Mr. Lipponen, you are our new favorite data geek!

07/31/17

  08:42:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 494 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Ranting

SE Takes the Leap, Highlighting Enphase's Superior Product - UPDATE!

UPDATE: The court has denied SolarEdge’s motion - read about it here.

In an earlier life I was a big firm lawyer, mostly handling hi-tech and intellectual property litigation.  Every now and then a client would get steamed over what they thought a competitor was doing, and would demand that we sue them - even though there was no merit in the case.  The competitor had a legal right to do what they were doing, even if it annoyed our client. 

Calmly, we would try to talk them down off the ledge less they draw more attention to the issue by suing than the activity ever would have on its own.  Apparently the folks at SolarEdge never got such advice as they have filed a frivolous lawsuit against competitor Enphase Energy over the video below.  Here’s our take…

SE is complaining that this video is “false and misleading” since it doesn’t illustrate the installation comparison that SE thinks is proper.  But that isn’t the standard.  Enphase says that they are comparing the install time on the roof between an Enphase-LG AC module and a SE optimizer system with separate modules.  Does that comparison exist in the real world of solar installations?  Of course.  In fact, if a solar installer wanted to use LG modules with SE, this is exactly the comparison that would be at issue! To suggest that such a comparison is false and misleading is to simply ignore real-world conditions. 

If SE wants to highlight a different, equally factual comparison, they are free to produce that ad, but that doesn’t give them the right to enjoin the factually accurate comparison that Enphase chose to highlight.

(SE also complains about the use of their logo in the video, but this is equally frivolous - that would be like saying that you couldn’t show a Pepsi can in a Coke ad.  Good luck with that.)

So far the court has not been too impressed with SE’s claim, denying a motion for a Temporary Restraining Order ("TRO"), saying:

Preliminary injunctive relief, whether in the form of a temporary restraining order or a preliminary injunction, is an “extraordinary and drastic remedy,” that is never awarded as of right.  In order to obtain such relief, a plaintiff must establish four factors: (1) he is likely to succeed on the merits; (2) he is likely to suffer irreparable harm in the absence of  preliminary relief; (3) the balance of equities tips in his favor; and (4) an injunction is in the public interest.
Here, with respect to the request for a temporary restraining order in advance of a hearing for a preliminary injunction, plaintiffs have wholly failed to establish a likelihood of immediate irreparable harm to justify the issuance of a temporary restraining order at this time.

Apparently SE is afraid that Enphase will show the ad during SPI.  But thanks to this ill-begotten lawsuit, probably everyone who would have seen it at SPI, will see it now!  Way to take the leap, SE, nicely done.

07/18/17

  10:17:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 459 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, SCE, Residential Solar, Net Metering

NEM 2.0 is Here - Now What?

Net Energy Metering 2.0, or NEM 2.0 for short, is now the law of the land, at least in SCE territory.  So what does that really mean for potential solar clients?  Here’s the scoop…

NEM 2.0 brings three changes to how new solar clients will be treated by SCE (customers of PWP, LADWP, or any other muni utility are unaffected).  Let’s take a quick run through each one:

  • A one-time application fee - new solar clients will be charged $75 as part of the interconnection application process.  (In the past there was no charge.)  Not a big deal, just another annoyance from SCE.
  • Switch to Time of Use rates - this is a much bigger deal.  Most residential customers are on a two-tiered rate structure with a “penalty” tier for users who exceed 4x baseline allocation.  Under that rate structure the maximum cost for energy is 31.224¢/kWh.
    Going forward, new solar customers will be charged based on when they use energy, not how much energy they use, with a Summer, on-peak energy cost of 44.665¢/kWh!  Ouch!  Peak hours are weekdays (holidays excepted) from 2-8 p.m.
  • Non-Bypassable Charges - Under the old rules, energy that was imported from the grid could be entirely offset by energy exported onto the grid.  Now, for every kilowatt hour imported, regardless of exports, the customer will pay a small (for now) non-bypassable charge of 2.25¢/kWh.  Again, the utilities were pressing for this to be a much higher number, but for now this is a relatively minor surcharge.

So what does this all mean?  The answer is, it varies.  For some clients, particularly those with west-facing roofs, they may actually do better under TOU rates than they would have staying on the old, tiered rate plan.  But to answer that question requires a proper analysis, and this is where potential solar clients need to do their homework and look closely at their solar bids. 

EnergyToolbase screenshot

Here’s what to look for.  Your potential installer should be requesting that you provide them with SCE’s “interval data” for your home.  This hour-by-hour data for the entire year allows for a proper analysis of your usage, and makes it possible to compare that historical usage with the modeled output of your proposed PV system.  If they aren’t asking for interval data, they are taking shortcuts with their savings analysis - likely in ways that inflate your potential savings on paper, only to result in disappointment down the road.

Run on Sun uses UtilityAPI to access SCE data securely, and we employ EnergyToolbase (pictured above) to do our analysis of your potential savings - two of the most highly respected and sophisticated tools in the solar industry.  We have the tools and the expertise to give you the most accurate projection of your future savings from solar - so let’s get started!

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Jim Jenal is the Founder & CEO of Run on Sun, Pasadena's premier installer and integrator of top-of-the-line solar power installations.
Run on Sun also offers solar consulting services, working with consumers, utilities, and municipalities to help them make solar power affordable and reliable.

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