Categories: All About Solar Power, Electric Cars that Run on Sun, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage, Safety

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01/29/15

  06:36:00 am, by Laurel Hamilton, Projects Coordinator, Run on Sun   , 406 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Solar Economics, Residential Solar

Its Official...Solar Boosts Home-Owners' Property Values!

Selling into the SunMany solar stakeholders have always assumed rooftop solar systems add to the resale value of a property. Homeowners and residential solar companies frequently use this benefit as one of the many reasons to invest in solar even though until recently there had been little statistical evidence to support the assumption.

So we were thrilled to read the new study, “Selling into the Sun: Price Premium Analysis of a Multi-State Dataset of Solar Homes,” which finally quantifies the resale value of residential photovoltaic  (PV) solar systems. The study was a collaborative effort including esteemed scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley Lab, Adomatis Appraisal Services, Real Property Analytics/Texas A&M University, University of California at San Diego, San Diego State University, and Sandia National Laboratories.

The team analyzed some 22,000 home sales, of which nearly 4,000 had PV rooftop solar systems (more than double the number in previous studies), in eight states over a 12-year span including the housing market boom, bust, and recovery. This is by far the largest and broadest dataset ever analyzed on the subject.

Results prove that homebuyers are consistently willing to pay more for homes with host-owned solar systems — averaging about $4 per watt of PV installed — across various states, housing and PV markets, and home types. This amounts to a premium of about $15,000 for a typical rooftop system. Other important conclusions the team discovered are as follows:

  • PV premiums had little variability between new and existing homes.
  • The dollar per watt premium decreases incrementally as system sizes increase - with the best value at 4 kilowatts (average household PV size) or less.
  • As systems age, the PV premium depreciates sharply from $6/watt for systems less than two years old to $3/watt after about eight years.
  • PV premiums correlate to the net cost of the solar system — which take into account rebates and incentives — and appear to be independent of the PV system gross cost estimates.

As residential solar systems become more and more common, it is important to be able to value them accurately. The evidence of the added investment value shown from this study is a critical step for the growth of residential solar. And PV premiums are obviously a benefit homeowners should consider when doing their cost-benefit analysis of going solar.

Please note that this study only focused on host-owned solar, not those with leased systems. It would be interesting to see a future study including this growing portion of the PV market.

01/23/15

  03:40:00 pm, by Laurel Hamilton, Projects Coordinator, Run on Sun   , 600 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power

Top 5 Reasons You Shouldn't Wait to Go Solar

Who wouldn’t want to cut energy bills by 80% or more while effectively eliminating one’s negative energy impacts on air, water and finite natural resources? But with solar booming in recent years and technology updates reported almost daily, many home and business owners feel they should wait for the latest and greatest, or simply for the cost to continue to go down. However, there are a number of important reasons why you shouldn’t wait…

Sundail

1. Minor Technology Gains Aren’t Worth the Wait

Research in the solar industry is ongoing and I have no doubt that panel technology will improve. However, most changes in design and efficiency are small. And the research and development necessary to ensure the technology works in the field and not just the lab takes time. The bottom line is this: the financial value of small efficiency gains from panel improvements is outweighed by the cost of waiting. Any money you might save by installing more efficient panels is significantly less than the money you would save immediately by installing solar today.

2. Further Price Cuts Aren’t Worth the Wait

The cost of solar panels has fallen tremendously the last few years – now half of what they were in 2008, and 100 times lower than they were in 1978! So, should you wait for the price to drop lower? We’ve actually started to see the prices of PV solar modules begin to flatten and even slightly increase since 2013. Now that demand for solar is gaining momentum, the costs will likely continue to rise to meet that demand.

3. Electric Costs Keep Rising

The rate of increase varies depending on your state and electricity source but based on the last decade you can expect around 4-5% hikes in grid electricity each year (Energy Information Administration). That means that if you invest in a solar system that meets 100% of your electricity needs today, you will fully save on this year’s costs. But each year thereafter you’ll save an additional 4-5% for the life of your solar system (up to 40 years). As energy prices skyrocket you can rest easy.

4. Rebates and Tax Breaks Are Going, Going…

Disappearing rebates...Rebates for installing solar, once as high as $4.00/Watt, have largely gone away (Pasadena being a happy, and notable, exception).  Since 2006 many owners have benefited from the 30% federal tax credit to make a solar installation more economically attractive. However, on December 31, 2016, the 30% Solar Investment Tax Credit is scheduled to drop to 10% for commercial projects and to zero for residential projects. While we’re all crossing our fingers and toes hoping for an extension, with imminent grid parity – solar power reaching a cost comparative status with grid electricity – predicted to happen in 2016 in much of the US, and a federal government with little support for solar…it is entirely possible an extension is no more than a pipe dream.

5. The Environment Can’t Wait

If you’re concerned about climate change, you know that we need to act quickly, and in any way possible to prevent overshooting the global goal of a maximum 2 degree rise over pre-industrial temperatures. The typical residential solar system, about 5 kW, cuts about 6.7 tons of carbon emissions each year (using EPA’s CO2 emissions calculations). While there isn’t a dollar figure attached to that, you may want to consider the larger environmental value of going solar sooner rather than later.

So, yes, you can wait and hope for the technology to improve or costs to decline. But meanwhile you’re tied to your polluting, fossil-fuel-based power company with its steadily escalating electricity prices. Ugh. In contrast, your choice to go solar will quickly prove to be a great return on investment. Why not start saving now?

01/20/15

  09:07:00 am, by Laurel Hamilton, Projects Coordinator, Run on Sun   , 414 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Climate Change

Thirsty? Think Solar!

Water-Energy NexusHere in SoCal discussions on water conservation are a regular occurrence. We all know the management of water resources in California is critical given increasing populations, increasing strains on our enormous agricultural ‘breadbasket’, and ever-decreasing precipitation as the effects of climate change worsen. However, how many of us think about energy in terms of water conservation?

According to the International Energy Agency, energy production accounts for 15% of the world’s water withdrawal – water withdrawn from groundwater. Thermoelectric power plants account for over one third of the fresh water withdrawn in the US. Shockingly that volume is greater than the water used to grow our food!

So which energy sources are hogging our precious water and how? Actually, most energy generation technologies — including coal, nuclear, biomass and even concentrating solar power – consume astounding amounts of water.  It is necessary primarily for cooling thermal power plants, as well as fuel extraction, transport and processing. This results in both the depletion of available freshwater resources and affects the quality of our remaining resources downstream due to the polluting effects of energy-related outputs.

Global water use for energy productionSunlight, on the other hand, is an infinitely abundant resource in most water-stressed parts of the world, including here in California. The World Energy Outlook, published by the International Energy Agency reported that photovoltaic (PV) solar energy is one of only two electricity generation technologies with negligible water consumption.

PV energy systems provide a sustainable solution to the water-energy nexus by generating clean electricity with little to no water use. With the smallest carbon footprint, lowest life cycle water use, and fastest energy payback time in the industry, thin-film PV modules provide a sustainable solution to water scarcity and energy security.

Water conservation must be a priority in water-stressed parts of the world. While PV solar is unlikely to provide enough power for the entire state any time soon, individuals and businesses installing roof-top solar can make a positive difference. It turns out, not only in reducing air pollution from dirty energy but also in saving our water resources!

It is important to note the other half of the energy-water nexus. Energy is required to produce, treat, and distribute water. So, even if solar is providing your electricity, the water you use is still linked to polluting energy sources. Combining smart water conservation techniques, such as those suggested in this EPA list of household water saving methods, with going solar is the best bet for ensuring our planet’s resources will continue to provide for our future.

01/16/15

  11:52:00 am, by Laurel Hamilton, Projects Coordinator, Run on Sun   , 417 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Solar Economics, State of Solar

The Numbers are In...Solar Means Jobs!

Velvet installs a solar roof.If you pay any attention to clean tech news, its no surprise to hear that the solar industry is growing. But the record-breaking results from the National Solar Jobs Census, released by the Solar Foundation (TSF) yesterday, are pretty astounding. The study found that the sector grew nearly 20 times the rate of the overall economy. One out of every 78 jobs added in the US in 2014 was in the solar industry! 

The Solar Foundation, an independent nonprofit solar research and education organization, has been conducting the annual National Solar Jobs Census since 2010. The 2014 report, derived directly from inerviews with more than 7,600 U.S. businesses, measured employment growth in the industry between November 2013 and November 2014.

We’ve pulled out a few highlights from the report:

Solar is Hiring!

Solar Jobs

  • As of November 2014, there were 173,807 solar workers employed, 1.3% of all jobs created in the U.S.
  • More than 31,000 new workers were hired in 2014, representing a growth rate of 21.8% since November 2013.
  • This means the Solar sector was hiring at nearly 20 times faster than the national average employment growth rate of 1.1% in the same period.
  • Between 2010 and 2014, employment in solar has grown by 86%, resulting in valuable domestic skilled living-wage jobs.
  • Installation continues to account for the largest share of solar jobs, currently employing over 97,000.

Solar Jobs ComparisonClean Energy is Speeding Past Fossil Fuel Sectors

  • The solar sector (173,807 jobs) is now larger than coal mining (93,185 jobs).
  • Indeed, more folks go to work each day installing solar panels than go into mines to dig out coal.  (And we know which job we’d rather have!)
  • In 2014 the solar industry created more jobs (31,000) than both the oil and gas pipeline construction industry (10,529), and the crude petroleum and natural gas extraction industry (8,688) combined.

Solar Welcomes Diversity

  • Women, African-Americans and Latinos are hired in solar at a higher rate than oil, gas, coal and construction industries.
  • Over 37,500 women worked in solar (21.6% of solar workers), up from 26,700 in 2013.
  • Nearly 17,000 veterans are now employed in the sector, up from 13,000 in 2013.

Trouble Ahead?

While surveyed solar employers are optimistic about 2015, expecting to add another 36,000 jobs, the solar boom may not last forever… 72% of employers surveyed noted that the federal tax credit significantly boosted their sales in 2014. Dramatic downsizing in 2017 after the federal tax credit expires is not out of the realm of possibility. (Are you listening, Washington?)

Studies like this one prove that solar is providing a tremendously valuable boost to our economy while meeting public demand for choice, competition, and cleaner, more affordable energy. Hopefully some form of incentives post-2016 will continue to keep this valuable ball rolling.

01/13/15

  06:06:00 pm, by Laurel Hamilton, Projects Coordinator, Run on Sun   , 517 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Utilities, Climate Change, Energy Efficiency

Internet of Things: Energy Saver or Vamping Nightmare?

Wikipedia Internet of ThingsAs its moniker suggests, the Internet of Things (IoT) is about the connectivity of ‘things’, not people. Hence, managing our hyper-connected world by using data from remote sensors in our devices to provide control in a smarter, more efficient way. As nebulous and vague as the ‘Internet of Things’ is, it has been cited as the hot technology trend of the future. In a recent Business Insider report, they estimate IoT growth will increase connections from 1.9 billion devices today, to 9 billion by 2018 (see chart below).

In fact, IoT is already a reality with 24/7 connectivity to laptops, tablets, smartphones, smart TVs, gaming consoles, and even wearable devices.

One of the best known applications for IoT is the smart metering of electricity, water, and waste systems as well as integrated management of home and building systems. Building temperature, humidity, ambient light and occupancy could be monitored by sensors and used to control heating, lighting, air-conditioning, and the operation of doors and windows, etc.

Business Insider IoT ChartSmart thermostats such as Google’s Nest allows home owners to manage their heating requirements remotely via their smartphone. Where utilities participate, users can program their biggest energy inefficient appliances (heating and cooling systems, washers and dryers, refrigerators, ovens, dishwashers, and pool pumps) to respond to varying energy tarifs and avoid peak demand periods. Sometimes demand reward credits are offered by utilities.

While these applications may make the workplace and home more comfortable and secure, the real motivation for adoption of such systems will be from potential energy benefits and hence cost savings. Avoiding peak periods would also have the broader environmental benefit of spreading demand, allowing power plants to operate more efficiently and reduce the need to build generating capacity to meet demand spikes.

But opinion seems divided over whether the Internet of Things will deliver improved energy efficiency overall. The exponential growth in the number of connected ‘things’ that all consume power could negate many of the efficiency gains of things like smart thermostats. More than $80 billion in power is wasted by connected ‘things’ according to an IEA (International Energy Agency) report. This is what is known as “vampire power”, or “vamping", and refers to energy used when devices are switched off or in standby mode. The IEA report notes the problem could result in $120 billion USD wasted by 2020 due to vamping!

One potential smart solution to vamping is to make appliances in the off or sleep mode actually power off but respond to a timer which is only responsive to the “on” switch during a portion of each second.  The long term key to whether IoT improves energy efficiency lies with improving the energy efficiency of the devices themselves while at the same time providing innovative applications.

The wider potential of the Internet of Things is enormous and exciting. Wider ’smart grids’ could make our urban centers dynamic and responsive to energy demands, optimizing city-level energy use. As the Internet of Things continues to grow, the opportunity for bigger energy and environmental benefits from applications like smart grids could become a valuable reality assuming the overall efficiency of our ‘things’ also continues to improve. 

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Jim Jenal is the Founder & CEO of Run on Sun, Pasadena's premier installer and integrator of top-of-the-line solar power installations.
In addition, Run on Sun offers solar consulting services, working with consumers, utilities and municipalities to help them make solar power affordable and reliable.

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