Category: Solar Tax Incentives


  03:16:00 pm, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 583 words  
Categories: Solar Tax Incentives, Commercial Solar, Residential Solar, Ranting

Preparing for the End - of the Solar Tax Credit

One of the chief economic benefits of going solar is the 30% Investment Tax Credit (the “ITC"), but it is scheduled to go away at the end of next year.  Here is what you need to know now if you hope to save yourself some serious coin on your solar system.

There are three economic benefits from going solar: rebates from the utility, savings on your utility bill, and the ITC.  For clients in the Run on Sun service area, only PWP and LADWP are presently offering rebates (sorry SCE folks) but at 40¢ and 30¢ per AC Watt installed, these rebates top out at roughly 10% of your cost.  Monthly savings from solar will vary depending on how big a user you are and what rate structure you are under.  Typically, SCE customers save more with solar because their rates are that much higher.

Don't leave ITC money on the table!But the one dominant factor that has helped to make solar more affordable, particularly as rebates have gone away, is the ITC.  A true tax credit (as opposed to an income deduction), the ITC is valued at 30% of the total cost of the system (less any rebate that might have been available).  For example, a 5 kW solar system in SCE territory that costs $4.00/Watt will see $1.20/Watt coming back as a credit on the system owner’s taxes.  (Oh, yeah, you have to own the system to capture the ITC - part of our #1 Reason to avoid a Solar Lease!)  That’s a $6,000 credit - pretty sweet!  And commercial clients not only get the ITC, they also get accelerated depreciation, making the tax advantages of solar even more attractive.

And yet, unless Congress acts (and really, does anyone have confidence in the ability of this Congress to do much of anything?), this will all end come December 31, 2016. (Ok, small caveat - commercial projects will continue to get 10%, but for residential clients it will be nada, nothing, zilch.)

I can hear you already saying, come on, that’s over a year away - why are you raising this issue now?  Well aside from the old warning: “Caution - dates on the calendar are closer than they appear!” – it is important to understand what is likely to happen next year.  Every solar company out there will start advertising about the need to “act now” only this time they will be right.  As more and more people realize that they are about to leave a whole bunch of money on the table, the crush to get projects in the pipeline and completed before the deadline will mean more demands on already understaffed city building departments (many of whom routinely take six weeks or more now to approve even the simplest solar project), inspectors, and utility staff to process an unprecedented flood of applications.

As we move through next Spring, many solar companies will already be booked so completely that homeowners who are just waking up to the problem, might find themselves in a pipeline with no guarantee that their project will be completed in time to qualify for the ITC.

So what to do?

Well, for the good of the solar industry as a whole you should contact your Member of Congress and urge him/her to support the extension of the ITC.  If you have friends and family who live in more conservative areas, be sure to urge them to do the same.

But as for your own solar project, the time to get started is now!   Don’t be the sad-sack who gets shut out of affordable solar because they waited too long.


  08:07:00 am, by Laurel Hamilton, Projects Coordinator, Run on Sun   , 364 words  
Categories: Solar Economics, Solar Tax Incentives, Ranting, Solar Policy

President Obama: Extend Solar Tax Credit... Congress: Don't make me laugh!

Two weeks ago I included the looming 2016 expiration of the federal Solar Investment Tax Credit (ITC) as one of the “Top 5 reasons you shouldn’t wait to go solar“. The 30% ITC rebate for residential and commercial solar projects is slated to drop to 10% for commercial projects (effectively stopping utility-scale solar growth) and to zero for residential projects (making going solar much less feasible for many homeowners). I mentioned that the likelihood of an extension is far from certain given our partisan federal ‘climate’.White House Flickr Photostream

Then…on Monday the White House released President Obama’s fiscal budget for 2016. To my delight the budget includes:

  1. Boosting clean energy funding to $7.4 billion;
  2. The Clean Power State Incentives Fund allocating $4 billion to encourage states to exceed the minimum requirements for cutting emissions; and
  3. The permanent extension of the solar Investment Tax Credit!

The $7.4 billion figure is up from the $6.9 billion proposed in Obama’s fiscal 2015 budget, a 7.2 percent rise, and over the $6.5 billion actually passed by Congress for this year. The extension of the ITC and further state incentives to reduce emissions would be immensely valuable to keep the ball rolling in the solar field. Given that solar is booming - providing over 170,000 living-wage jobs and eliminating over 13 million metric tons of harmful CO2 emissions in 2014 alone - it makes sense to continue to incentivize. 

However, it may come as no surprise to hear that some lawmakers have said they plan to block the President’s budget priorities entirely. An article in Politico titled “Republicans: Obama Budget ‘Laughable’” cites many congressional Republicans disdain for the budget.

“Obama’s budget is a retread of past proposals that died instantly on the Hill.”
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-Utah)

The website cites the singular case of Solyndra as definitive evidence to oppose funding clean energy…despite also claiming to support job growth. (See here as to why Solyndra just doesn’t matter.) With Republicans now controlling both the Senate and the House of Representative, this party line opposition will be a serious challenge to overcome.

Even with the President himself in favor of extending the ITC, and improving funding to support clean energy, the fate of federal support for the solar industry is still quite uncertain.

Watch this space.


  09:17:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 175 words  
Categories: Solar Tax Incentives, Commercial Solar, Energy Storage, Solar Policy

Run on Sun Featured on Disruption!

Over the weekend I had the opportunity to record an interview for the Disruption! podcast, hosted by Roger Willhite.  We talked about my book, Commercial Solar: Step-by-Step, the origin and future of Run on Sun, and larger solar industry trends.

Disruption! podcastIn case you are not familiar with Roger’s work, you should check out his website, Second Silicon, which operates under the tagline, “Get absorbed in Solar” - a sentiment we strongly endorse!

His podcast series, Disruption!, has now recorded fifteen segments, and has included such well known solar industry players as Danny Kennedy, Tor “Solar Fred” Valenza, Frank Andorka, and Jigar Shah, to name a few.  Heady company indeed, and we were honored to be invited to participate.  (One interesting thing about the process - Roger lives in South Korea so the interview was recorded over Skype—pretty cool!)

In any event, here’s the interview - the opening audio features some sound bites from prior podcasts before we get started - how many of those voices can you identify?

Thanks again to Roger for including me in his wonderful series.


Commercial Solar: Step-by-Step - Available Now!

We have been teasing out bits and pieces of our new book, Commercial Solar: Step-by-Step, all summer as we neared the end of the publication process.  Well today we can formally announce that it is available both at the Run on Sun Publishing eStore (where we get a better royalty - hint, hint!) and on!

Cover art - Commercial Solar: step by step

Commercial Solar is intended for two primary audiences:

  • Owners & operators of commercial buildings, and
  • Solar contractors who are looking for a meaningful “leave behind” item to give to their potential commercial clients.

As the title suggests, the book provides an overview of the process by which an interested party - say, a facilities manager - can go from knowing next to nothing about commercial solar to identifying appropriate contractors to provide bids, analyzing those bids to make meaningful comparisons, determining financing options that are appropriate and even overseeing the actual installation process.

The book features a Foreword written by Boaz Soifer, VP of Sales at Focused Energy:

The material could be dry (much of the reading on this subject is), but is instead casual but precise, clearly laid out, and made accessible through handy use of a narrative in which the Facilities Manager of a fictional company undertakes a commercial solar project himself…

In his typical style—approachable, honest, quirky, and occasionally scathing—Jim has thoughtfully flattened out the com­plex world of commercial solar PV into an under­standable roadmap that anyone can follow to project success.

Interested? You can download a two-chapter excerpt of the book for free, here.  Better yet, you can purchase the book today from either our eStore or Amazon for just $9.95.  If you are interested in bulk sales (i.e., ten or more copies), discounts are available.  Please contact us at Bulk Sales for more information.

And of course, we welcome your comments either here on the blog or at Amazon.  Thanks for your support.


  06:48:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 970 words  
Categories: Solar Economics, Solar Rebates, Solar Tax Incentives, Commercial Solar, Non-profit solar

Financing Commercial Solar: Part 2 - Leasing & PPAs

In Part 1 of this series on financing commercial solar power systems we explored the basics - cash purchases and commercial loans.  Now in Part 2 we move on to examine the pros and cons of solar leasing arrangements and Power Purchase Agreements (PPA’s).


MoneyAn option that has gained significant traction in the past few years are leases.  (Indeed, it is the explosion of solar leasing in the residential market that has fueled the growth of major players like SolarCity and Verengo.)  But leases can come with unexpected traps for the unwary and a commercial customer needs to look closely at the details before signing on to a lease agreement for a commercial solar power system.

In a solar lease arrangement the right to use the solar power system is transferred from the owner, referred to as the lessor, to the lessee.  From an accounting perspective, all leases are either considered a capital lease (or finance lease) or an operating lease. Generally speaking, “capital leases are considered equivalent to a purchase, while operating leases cover the use of an asset for a period of time.”

When leases are applied to solar power systems, other important considerations apply.

Capital Leases

Under accounting standards, a capital lease is defined as “a lease that transfers substantially all the benefits and risks of ownership to the lessee.”

Therefore, with a capital lease, as with a cash purchase or loan, the solar client is treated as the owner of the system and receives the benefits of ownership: utility rebates and tax incentives (if applicable).  The capital lease is often for a longer term – the basic criteria is that the lease must run for at least 75 percent of the estimated economic life of the system – that is, between 15 and 19 years or longer.

The longer term can keep payments lower, but because the solar client lessee receives the rebate and tax incentives, the capital lease might carry a higher interest rate than does an operating lease.  At the end of the term, the lessee can typically purchase the system at below market cost, perhaps for as little as a nominal one dollar.

Operating Leases

In contrast, with an operating lease the solar client lessee does not effectively own the system and the lessor retains the utility rebate and the tax incentives.  Rather, the lessee is simply acquiring the right to use the system for a limited time in exchange for periodic rental payments.  Typically an operating lease will be for a shorter period of time, and potentially at a lower interest rate.  However, at the end of the lease term the lessee either has the system removed by the lessor, enters into a new lease arrangement, or must purchase the system for fair market value.

Power Purchase Agreements

A related, but different vehicle for making use of a solar power system is a Power Purchase Agreement or PPA.  As with an operating lease, the solar client under a PPA does not own the system.  Rather, they purchase the electricity that the system produces from the system owner.  (Presumably at a price lower than what they would be paying their utility for the same quantity of energy.)

Since the solar client under a PPA only pays for the energy actually produced by the system, the system owner has a greater incentive to maintain the system at peak efficiency and the solar client may receive more of the “benefit of their bargain” under a PPA than they would under an operating lease.

PPA’s typically contain “escalator clauses” by which the price paid per kilowatt hour generated may increase over time.  As long as PPA costs increase more slowly than do utility rate increases, the solar client’s savings will grow over time.  However, it is possible under a PPA to actually end up paying more for energy to the system owner than the client would have to the local utility.  (Indeed, this possibility is what gave rise to a class action lawsuit against Sunrun.)

Federal Trade Commission Concerns

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is the federal agency charged with regulating false or deceptive marketing claims, and solar leasing options can surprisingly lead to unwanted scrutiny from the FTC.  The FTC’s concern is  “double counting” - multiple entities taking credit for the same environmental benefit.  This sort of double counting can occur when a company hosts a solar power system, but does not own it.

The FTC provides this as an illustrative example:

A toy manufacturer places solar panels on the roof of its plant to generate power, and advertises that its plant is “100% solar-powered.” The manufacturer, however, sells renewable energy certificates based on the renewable attributes of all the power it generates. Even if the manufacturer uses the electricity generated by the solar panels, it has, by selling renewable energy certificates, transferred the right to characterize that electricity as renewable. The manufacturer’s claim is therefore deceptive. It also would be deceptive for this manufacturer to advertise that it “hosts” a renewable power facility because reasonable consumers likely interpret this claim to mean that the manufacturer uses renewable energy. It would not be deceptive, however, for the manufacturer to advertise, “We generate renewable energy, but sell all of it to others.”

Deceptive claims are actionable under the FTC’s mandate and offending companies could be subject to enforcement actions and fines.  Under either an operating lease or a PPA (though likely not under a capital lease unless the Renewable Energy Credits (RECs) associated with the system are assigned to the utility), the solar client does not own the solar power system and any claim to be “solar-powered” or “using green energy” would be deceptive under the FTC’s guidance.

The series concludes with Part 3 - Commercial PACE and Crowd Funding.

The preceding is an excerpt from Jim Jenal’s upcoming book, “Commercial Solar: Step-by-Step,” due out in July.

1 2 3 4 5 >>

Jim Jenal is the Founder & CEO of Run on Sun, Pasadena's premier installer and integrator of top-of-the-line solar power installations.
In addition, Run on Sun offers solar consulting services, working with consumers, utilities and municipalities to help them make solar power affordable and reliable.

Ready to Save?

Let’s Get Started!

We're Social!

Follow Run on Sun on Twitter Like Run on Sun on Facebook


Run on Sun helps fight Climate Change
powered by b2evolution