Category: SCE/CSI Rebates

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01/15/15

  09:32:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 722 words  
Categories: Solar Rebates, PWP Rebates, SCE/CSI Rebates, BWP Rebates, GWP Rebates, LADWP Rebates

2015 Solar Rebate Update

Solar rebates are rapidly becoming an endangered species, but there are still a handful of refuges out there for the lucky few who reside in those areas. Here is our update on who is offering what as of January, 2015.

Solar rebates

Although there are lots of ways to approach this, we figured that the most entertaining would be to rank-order each utility in the Run on Sun service area from best to worst in terms of their rebate program (and we will toss in a handy summary chart at the end).

Pasadena Water & Power (PWP)

Beyond a doubt, the best run solar rebate program in our service area is provided by our hometown utility, Pasadena Water & Power.  The folks at PWP have figured out how to provide generous rebates on a predictable schedule while keeping bureaucratic annoyances to a minimum.  Boy could its neighbors learn a thing or two from PWP!

Here are their numbers as of today:

Residential: $0.85/Watt EPBB; 12.9¢/kWh PBI.
Commercial: $0.85/Watt EPBB; 12.9¢/kWh PBI.
Non-Profit: $1.60/Watt EPBB; 24.2¢/kWh PBI.

Keep in mind, those numbers have been in place for a long time (since 2012!) and we expect them to drop some time this year.

Anaheim

Anaheim is offering some big rebate numbers, but they offer a ridiculously small window of opportunity for snagging them.  Specifically, the window is about to open and you need to submit a rebate application between today, January 15, 2015 and two weeks from today as the window closes on January 29!  After that you are out-of-luck until the next window is set.  For those who can jump on the opportunity, here are the numbers:

Residential: $1.25/Watt EPBB; n/a PBI.
Commercial: $1.10/Watt EPBB; 11.0¢/kWh PBI.
Non-Profit: n/a.

Which brings us to the problem children…

Azusa

Azusa has a rebate program, maybe.  But what it really has as of now is a waiting list.  Good luck with that.

Burbank Water & Power (BWP) and Glendale Water & Power (GWP)

Burbank and Glendale feel like the same city so its not surprising that their local utilities seem to act in lock step.  Both utilities arguably offer rebates, but unlike PWP - their more intelligent neighbor to the East - neither BWP nor GWP can figure out how to keep a rebate program open for more than a few weeks (days?) at a time.  They say they are victims of their own success, but we see it as a sign of bad planning.  (Oh, and don’t get us started about GWP’s alleged Feed-in Tariff program which after a year and a half is yet to have a single application submitted! Genius!)

As for now, all the unfortunate residents of these two communities can do is wait until the new fiscal year in July and hope that some funds will be allocated.

Southern California Edison (SCE)

In SCE territory the party is officially over - there are no more rebate funds available, and despite the Governor’s call for 50% of electricity to come from renewables by 2030, there are no moves a foot to refund the CSI program.  This is unfortunate beyond the lack of funding - with the demise of the CSI rebates, so goes the CSI data since that was only gathered as part of the rebate process.  As a result, we lose a major solar incentive along with a major source of market data for the largest solar market in the country!  More genius!  (Here’s a thought - since SCE still requires us to go through the interconnection agreement process - via email - why not collect the data that way?)

Los Angeles Department of Water & Power (LADWP)

LADWP offers a rebate, but they have the most excruciating process ever for getting it.  (Think of that wealthy Uncle who could easily help you out, but is going to make you bow and scrape before he cuts loose with some ducats, and you get the picture.)  Moreover, non-residential rebates are going away in favor of the Feed-in Tariff program, but for small commercial or non-profit customers, that option simply doesn’t pencil out. 

For those residential customers with the patience to outlast the bureaucrats, here’s their rebate:

Residential: $0.40/Watt EPBB; n/a PBI.

Frankly, that’s just not worth the trouble.

In Summary

So here’s the overall results for all of these utilities:

Solar rebate rates in Run on Sun service area, January 2015

While rebates are going away, the 30% federal tax credit is still in place, and will continue through the end of 2016. Carpe diem!

03/18/14

  09:10:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 463 words  
Categories: SCE/CSI Rebates, Commercial Solar, Residential Solar, Ranting, Non-profit solar

The (Rebate) Party's Over - SCE Imposes Residential Wait List

SCE logoThe folks running the CSI rebate program over at SCE (alas, dear Bruce, we barely knew ye) announced yesterday the imposition of a wait list for all residential solar rebates. In an email received at 1:53 p.m. on March 17th with the subject line, “CSI Waitlist Notification", we were informed as follows:

Dear CSI Solar Community:

Update on CSI Program Status

The remaining funds in SCE’s California Solar Initiative (CSI) Residential Incentive Program continue to be reserved at a higher than usual pace. Although California Solar Statistics shows just over a million dollars in Remaining Funds, the presence of “Remaining Funds” for a given Program does not mean that all those funds are available as incentives for available projects. Consequently, SCE will be establishing a wait list sooner than anticipated in an effort to ensure there is no oversubscription of the remaining funds. The Waitlist will become effective end of day on Monday March 17, 2014.

All new residential applications received after 7:00pm PST on Monday, March 17, 2014 will be placed onto the Wait List. SCE will continuously monitor the remaining incentive funds and review the highest waitlisted application as funding becomes available. Applications that do not have all required and correct documentation will be suspended and given 14 days to submit the requested information. If the documentation is not submitted correctly within the suspension period, the application will be cancelled and removed from the waitlist. All suspension timelines will be strictly enforced. Additionally, wait list projects may still have an opportunity to receive an incentive if previously reserved projects are cancelled out of the CSI Program. Please note waitlist projects will be reserved in the order received and are not guaranteed an incentive.

SCE has recently requested permission from the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to shift some nonresidential incentive funds into the residential incentive budget. If approved by the CPUC, SCE will be able to allocate more megawatts and therefore more incentive dollars for CSI residential projects.

If you have any questions please call the CSI Helpline at (866)584-7436.

Sincerely,

CSI Program Administrator
Southern California Edison

Who waits until mere hours before a deadline to announce the deadline?  Why not simply announce it after the fact and be done with the drama?

So what does this mean?  It means that as of now, residential CSI rebates in SCE territory are no longer guaranteed.  Of course, at 20¢/Watt they were nearly gone for a while now, but this makes it official.  Presumably non-residential rebates are still available, but it sounds like SCE will ask the CPUC for permission to tap that piggy bank and shift some or all of those funds to the residential program.

If you are a commercial, or more significantly, non-profit entity considering going solar, you better act quickly before those moneys disappear as well.

02/25/14

  06:38:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 224 words  
Categories: Solar Rebates, PWP Rebates, SCE/CSI Rebates, BWP Rebates, GWP Rebates, LADWP Rebates

Solar Rebate Update

Solar rebates are fleeting in many locations—now you see them, now you don’t. Case in point, Burbank Water and Power (as is the case with its cousin in Glendale) is notorious for offering, and then taking away solar rebates.  We monitor BWP’s website for new developments, and we have now learned that they will be holding a lottery for possible rebate funds next July.  No additional details were made available; presumably they will be posted sometime in June.

Given that development, we decided to update our overall rebate status.  Here is how things stand generally in the Run on Sun service area as of this date:

UtilityEPBB ($/Watt)PBI (¢/kWh)
(Click to see website)ResidentialCommercialNon-ProfitResidentialCommercialNon-Profit
Anaheim Unavailable until June, 2014 Unavailable until June, 2014
Azusa Wait List Wait List
Burbank (BWP) Lottery in July, 2014 Lottery in July, 2014 (30 kW or less)
Glendale (GWP) Unavailable until 7/1/2014 Unavailable until 7/1/2014
Los Angeles (LADWP) $0.40 $0.70 $1.45 Not used
Pasadena (PWP) $0.85 $0.85 $1.60 12.9¢ 12.9¢ 24.2¢
SoCal Edison (SCE) $0.20 $0.25 $0.90 2.5¢ 3.2¢ 11.4¢

Here are a couple of very important qualifications to what appears in that table:

  • LADWP still has $5.9M for non-residential solar rebates.  Once those funds are gone, the Feed-in Tariff will be the only game in town for commercial solar in LA.
  • SCE appears to be down to the final $3M in residential rebate funds, with roughly another $78M in non-residential funds still available.

This is a moving target; watch this space.

09/16/13

Commercial Solar: Step-by-Step - Available Now!

We have been teasing out bits and pieces of our new book, Commercial Solar: Step-by-Step, all summer as we neared the end of the publication process.  Well today we can formally announce that it is available both at the Run on Sun Publishing eStore (where we get a better royalty - hint, hint!) and on Amazon.com!

Cover art - Commercial Solar: step by step

Commercial Solar is intended for two primary audiences:

  • Owners & operators of commercial buildings, and
  • Solar contractors who are looking for a meaningful “leave behind” item to give to their potential commercial clients.

As the title suggests, the book provides an overview of the process by which an interested party - say, a facilities manager - can go from knowing next to nothing about commercial solar to identifying appropriate contractors to provide bids, analyzing those bids to make meaningful comparisons, determining financing options that are appropriate and even overseeing the actual installation process.

The book features a Foreword written by Boaz Soifer, VP of Sales at Focused Energy:

The material could be dry (much of the reading on this subject is), but is instead casual but precise, clearly laid out, and made accessible through handy use of a narrative in which the Facilities Manager of a fictional company undertakes a commercial solar project himself…

In his typical style—approachable, honest, quirky, and occasionally scathing—Jim has thoughtfully flattened out the com­plex world of commercial solar PV into an under­standable roadmap that anyone can follow to project success.

Interested? You can download a two-chapter excerpt of the book for free, here.  Better yet, you can purchase the book today from either our eStore or Amazon for just $9.95.  If you are interested in bulk sales (i.e., ten or more copies), discounts are available.  Please contact us at Bulk Sales for more information.

And of course, we welcome your comments either here on the blog or at Amazon.  Thanks for your support.

04/10/13

  09:40:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 908 words  
Categories: Solar News, SCE/CSI Rebates, SCE, NABCEP, Commercial Solar, Residential Solar, SDG&E

Picking a Commercial Solar Contractor: NICELY Does It!

Before you can ever get a bid for your commercial solar project, you have to contact a solar installation contractor to come out to your location and perform a site evaluation.  Actually, you should contact at least three contractors so that you have a set of bids to compare (more on that process below) - but how do you find them in the first place?  Well, you could choose based on who has the most ads on TV or the Internet, or you could rely on Cousin Billy’s recommendation - but somehow that just doesn’t seem sufficiently scientific for a project like this.  There has to be a better way - and there is.

If you remember that you need to find someone who will work NICELY with you, success is all but assured.  And no, we don’t mean nicely, we mean NICELY - as in:

N - NABCEP Certification
I - Incentive provider (CSI or local utility) connected
C - City building department experienced
E - Electrician on staff
L - Local or national?
Y - Years in business.

Focus on those attributes and you will have found a contractor who will inspire confidence and guarantee a successful project.  Let’s expand on why these particular attributes are so important.

NABCEP Certification

NABCEP CertifiedThe North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners - NABCEP for short - provides the most rigorous certification process of solar installation professionals in the industry.  Not to be confused with their Entry Level Letter that merely demonstrates that the person has taken an introductory course in solar,  the NABCEP Certified Solar PV Installer™ credential is the Gold Standard for installers and consumers alike.  Earning NABCEP Certification requires the successful candidate to have an educational background in electrical engineering or related technical areas (such as an IBEW union apprenticeship program), at least two solar installations as the lead installer, and the successful passing of a 4-hour written examination on all aspects of solar power system design and installation.

As NABCEP notes:

When you hire a contractor with NABCEP Certified Installers leading the crew, you can be confident that you are getting the job done by solar professionals who have the “know-how” that you need. They are part of a select group of people who have distinguished themselves by being awarded NABCEP Certified Installer credentials.

NABCEP’s website offers a database of all Certified Solar PV Installers - just enter your zip code to find the installers located near you.  It is with great pride that we point out that at Run on Sun, all three of our owners have earned the designation, NABCEP Certified Solar PV Installer™ - and we know of no other solar power company in Southern California that can make that claim.

Incentive Provider - CSI or Local Utility

A second source of solar installers is the Incentive provider such as the California Solar Initiatives’ Go Solar California website.  Every installer who has done a solar power installation for a CSI utility (i.e., SCE, PG&E or SDG&E) will be included on this list.  Unfortunately, there are no other criteria associated with getting listed - and there is limited verification done to guarantee that the listed installer is reliable.  If your job is in California, your contractor must be on this list - but this is a double-check only - not an ideal starting point for your search.

Another source for information about solar installers is your local utility’s point person for solar rebates.  This person deals with installers on a daily basis, and while s/he won’t give you a specific recommendation, they may be able to warn you off of an installer whom they have learned is less than reliable.

City Building Department

Similarly, the folks in your local building department deal with installers regularly as part of the permitting/inspection process.  Once again, they won’t be in a position to provide referrals, but they may be able to give you a warning if there are red flags associated with a contractor that you are considering.

Local or National?

Solar installation companies come in all sizes - from national organizations that have crews installing systems all across the country, to local operations that only work in a limited geographic region.  To be sure, there are pluses and minuses on both ends — maybe lower prices for the national chain due to economy of scale in their purchasing versus greater attention to detail from a local company that lives or dies based on how well it satisfies its local customer base.  And, of course, money spent on a local company tends to stay in the local economy - another consideration in tough economic times.

Years in Business

The last of the NICELY elements is to look at the number of years the company has been in business.  Again, this is not a perfect indicator – some recent ventures really have their act together and some long-standing enterprises have long since ceased to really care about what they are doing – but at a minimum you want some assurance that the folks you are doing business with know how to run a business. Otherwise you run the risk of having a largely useless warranty and no one to call if things go wrong.

We would recommend a minimum of three-to-five years in the business of doing solar, with preferably a longer track record of running a business.  Expertise in areas beyond just installing solar is also useful such as engineering, management and law.


The preceding is an excerpt from Jim Jenal’s upcoming book, “Commercial Solar Step-by-Step,” due out in July.

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Jim Jenal is the Founder & CEO of Run on Sun, Pasadena's premier installer and integrator of top-of-the-line solar power installations.
In addition, Run on Sun offers solar consulting services, working with consumers, utilities and municipalities to help them make solar power affordable and reliable.

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