Category: Commercial Solar

01/12/16

Who is Paying You to Go Solar in 2016?

Show me the money!The new year is well underway (Happy New Year!), and so it is timely to revisit the question of financial incentives to Go Solar in the Run on Sun service area.  (You can read more detail about all of these incentives on our Solar Financing page.)

Federal Tax Credit

Beyond a doubt, the most significant incentive for going solar is the 30% federal tax credit.  Previously set to expire at the end of this year, the federal solar tax credit was extended late last year, continuing at the present 30% through 2019

The credit applies to solar installations in every utility’s territory, so no matter where you live in the U.S., this credit applies to you.  (NB: this is a tax credit, not an income deduction, so you need the tax “appetite” to take full advantage of this incentive - check with your tax advisor.)  For residential clients, the basis for the credit is the full cost of your solar project, less any rebate that you might receive from the utility.  Commercial clients, who must declare any rebate as income, do not need to deduct their rebate from the system cost when calculating the basis.

Utility Rebates

Once common everywhere, utility rebates are going the way of the dodo—with one or two notable exceptions.  We have rank ordered the local utilities below, based on the reliability of their rebate program.

Pasadena Water & Power

The big winner, again and by far, is the solar rebate program operated by our own Pasadena Water and Power.  Year in and year out, PWP offers rebates to its customers in a transparent and consistent manner - something that cannot be said of any of its neighboring utilities.

As of this writing, PWP is offering a rebate of $0.45/Watt for both residential and commercial customers, and a rebate of $0.90/Watt to non-profit customers (who cannot take advantage of the federal tax credit).  Alternatively, PWP also offers a performance-based incentive that is paid out over two years based on the actual production of the system.  Residential and commercial customers are paid 14.4¢/kWh, whereas non-profit customers are paid 28.8¢/kWh.

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

LADWP offers a rebate, if you have the stamina to receive it. Vexed with the most bureaucratic process to be found this side of Orwell’s 1984 dystopia, applying for and receiving a rebate from DWP often feels like a reward for a life well spent.

That said, LADWP is currently offering rebates of $0.30/Watt to residential customers, $0.40/Watt to commercial, and $1.15/Watt to non-profits.  Just don’t hold your breath.

Burbank Water & Power and Glendale Water & Power

These two municipal utilities often feel like one and the same given their similar approach to rebates - which is to say, now you see ‘em, no you don’t.

Unlike their neighbor to the east, neither BWP nor GWP is able to maintain a rebate program throughout the year.  Instead, both open their rebate windows on or about July 1st (i.e., the start of their fiscal year) and then hand out money until it is gone, at which time the window slams shut until the following July 1.

Burbank’s program operates under a lottery, which last year opened on July 1 and was exhausted by August 15.  In addition, BWP imposes restrictions on the azimuth and pitch of rebated systems, despite their being no technical justification for doing so.

Glendale’s program is even less transparent, and the installation/rebate process is outlined in a 23-step ode to inefficiency.

We will revisit both of these program in mid-June to provide what guidance we can to the residents of these two cities.

Azusa Light & Water

The “Solar Partnership Program” in Azusa is fully subscribed.  There is a wait list that solar-hopeful customers can get on in the hope that at some point there will be rebate funds available - with no guarantees that there ever will be.

Anaheim

The Anaheim Solar Incentive Program was fully subscribed as of October 1, 2015 and is now closed, with no published plans to revise the program in the future.

Southern California Edison

SCE’s rebates, which were part of the larger, California Solar Initiative, have expired and no new funds are anticipated.  Of course, SCE customers still have the highest electricity rates around, which provides its own—albeit perverse—incentive to Go Solar!

12/05/15

  09:37:00 am, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 445 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Solar Tax Incentives, Commercial Solar, Residential Solar, Ranting, Non-profit solar

3 Minutes to Save 30% - UPDATE!

UPDATE - 12/16 - Congress unveils a potential 5-Year Extension!

On Tuesday, Congressional leaders unveiled a behemoth spending bill (as in 2,009 pages!) that includes an extension for the solar tax credit.  As proposed, here are the details:

  • Continuation of the present 30% credit for three years, until 12/31/2019;
  • Step down to 26% for one year until 12/31/2020;
  • Step down to 22% for one year until 12/31/2021;
  • Step down to 10% for any project commenced before 1/1/2022 but not placed in service before 1/1/2024.
  • Change effective date to be the start of construction.

To be sure, this is not yet a done deal and Congress could balk on passing the bill, so watch this space!  Better yet, use the form below and tell your Representative to support the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016.


We have written about how the federal Investment Tax Credit - which provides solar system owners a credit on their taxes worth 30% of the system cost - is set to expire at the end of 2016 and the havoc that will cause in the industry.  We have been skeptical that the present Congress would act to extend the credit.  But activism is always better than skepticism, and right now there is a chance to act to save the ITC!

US Congress - they need to hear from you!It is a classic Congressional tradition - horse trading some call it, logrolling is another term of art - but at the end of the day it means compromise.  It turns out that there are tax credits that Republicans love (e.g., credits to businesses for various types of purchases) and tax credits that Democrats love (e.g., the earned income credit and others that generally help lower income constituents).  Turns out that there are enough of those credits on both sides (it is left as a challenge for the reader to determine which side of the aisle is supporting the solar ITC) to make it possible, maybe even likely, that a compromise bill could get through.

But there are many reasons why it might fail.  Deficit hawks in the House might try to derail it over its cost.  Democrats might complain it gives away too much to Big Business.  In short, it is the sort of compromise in which everyone can find something to love, as well as something to hate.  But can it pass?  That’s where you come in.

Below is a form where you can get the contact information for your member of Congress just by entering your zip code…

Take just three minutes to look up your Representative and give them a call.  When you get them on the line, tell them to support the longest possible extension of the solar ITC.  Three minutes to save 30% on future solar installations - that’s what we call time well spent!

10/27/15

  03:16:00 pm, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 583 words  
Categories: Solar Tax Incentives, Commercial Solar, Residential Solar, Ranting

Preparing for the End - of the Solar Tax Credit

One of the chief economic benefits of going solar is the 30% Investment Tax Credit (the “ITC"), but it is scheduled to go away at the end of next year.  Here is what you need to know now if you hope to save yourself some serious coin on your solar system.

There are three economic benefits from going solar: rebates from the utility, savings on your utility bill, and the ITC.  For clients in the Run on Sun service area, only PWP and LADWP are presently offering rebates (sorry SCE folks) but at 40¢ and 30¢ per AC Watt installed, these rebates top out at roughly 10% of your cost.  Monthly savings from solar will vary depending on how big a user you are and what rate structure you are under.  Typically, SCE customers save more with solar because their rates are that much higher.

Don't leave ITC money on the table!But the one dominant factor that has helped to make solar more affordable, particularly as rebates have gone away, is the ITC.  A true tax credit (as opposed to an income deduction), the ITC is valued at 30% of the total cost of the system (less any rebate that might have been available).  For example, a 5 kW solar system in SCE territory that costs $4.00/Watt will see $1.20/Watt coming back as a credit on the system owner’s taxes.  (Oh, yeah, you have to own the system to capture the ITC - part of our #1 Reason to avoid a Solar Lease!)  That’s a $6,000 credit - pretty sweet!  And commercial clients not only get the ITC, they also get accelerated depreciation, making the tax advantages of solar even more attractive.

And yet, unless Congress acts (and really, does anyone have confidence in the ability of this Congress to do much of anything?), this will all end come December 31, 2016. (Ok, small caveat - commercial projects will continue to get 10%, but for residential clients it will be nada, nothing, zilch.)

I can hear you already saying, come on, that’s over a year away - why are you raising this issue now?  Well aside from the old warning: “Caution - dates on the calendar are closer than they appear!” – it is important to understand what is likely to happen next year.  Every solar company out there will start advertising about the need to “act now” only this time they will be right.  As more and more people realize that they are about to leave a whole bunch of money on the table, the crush to get projects in the pipeline and completed before the deadline will mean more demands on already understaffed city building departments (many of whom routinely take six weeks or more now to approve even the simplest solar project), inspectors, and utility staff to process an unprecedented flood of applications.

As we move through next Spring, many solar companies will already be booked so completely that homeowners who are just waking up to the problem, might find themselves in a pipeline with no guarantee that their project will be completed in time to qualify for the ITC.

So what to do?

Well, for the good of the solar industry as a whole you should contact your Member of Congress and urge him/her to support the extension of the ITC.  If you have friends and family who live in more conservative areas, be sure to urge them to do the same.

But as for your own solar project, the time to get started is now!   Don’t be the sad-sack who gets shut out of affordable solar because they waited too long.

06/11/15

  06:41:00 pm, by Laurel Hamilton, Projects Coordinator, Run on Sun   , 754 words  
Categories: All About Solar Power, Commercial Solar, Residential Solar

Roofing reality check. Top 3 considerations for solar

So, you are considering a solar power system for your home or business… and why not, given the myriad of social, environmental and economic benefits! But how do you know if your roof is a good candidate? This is one of the top questions to consider carefully before investing in solar. 

Many faces can make layout challenging.1. Do I have enough space?

The size of your solar system is dependent on your usage needs and the amount you want to offset. However, it is not uncommon to find homes and businesses which are “footprint-constrained” - meaning their system size is limited by the space available.

A few things to keep in mind as you look at your roof and ponder how big is big enough… First, while there are many different solar panels they are typically the same size. Run on Sun uses LG panels which are about 65 x 40 inches and can be placed in either a portrait or landscape layout. Panel energy ratings vary, 285-315 watt panels are currently available from LG. For an average home (5 kW) that means you would need around 16-18 panels to offset the bulk of your electricity.

Another limitation is that fire code requires three feet of clear space from all ridges. If you have an irregular shaped roof with many valleys and peaks it may make the layout very challenging. Given that the panels are rectangular and racking is mounted parallel to the roof, rectangular spaces are ideal. However, the 3-foot rule does not apply to uninhabited spaces such as garages and carports making them good options if your home lacks the perfect solar roof. 

Trees can shade your roof and degrade your solar panel output.


2. What if my roof is shaded?

Shading from trees, tall buildings, chimneys, or even parapets on flat roofs can significantly degrade the energy output from solar panels. Sometimes all that needs to be done is a generous trimming of that tree that’s gotten a little out of control over the years. Other times it means you really won’t get your money’s worth out of a solar system. But, if the shade elements are few and only during a short time each day, your roof may still be a viable candidate.

If this is the case be sure to talk to your solar contractor about inverters. We have written a great deal about the advantages of “microinverters” in handling shaded roofs, particularly those made by Enphase Energy.  “String inverters” on the other hand would be a bad choice as the entire system would degrade when any single panel is shaded. 

 

3. Should I re-roof my house before adding a solar system?

This may be the most important and frequently overlooked question to consider when researching if solar is right for you. Part of what makes solar a great investment is the 25+ year lifetime of the system. But if you have to re-roof during that time there are added costs to remove and re-install the system. If you are planning to re-roof during the lifetime of your solar array be sure you select components, such as the racking system, from companies that…A. will still be around 15-25 years later, and B. will be able to provide compatible replacement parts when pieces are lost during removal and re-installation. Avoid newer companies testing out “state-of-the-art” racking systems and cheap companies banking on the solar boom alone.

For this reason we always ask owners the age of their roof. In southern California, a roof over ten years old should get a makeover before installing solar. If you are unsure of the condition, it is a good idea to have a professional roofer take a look and give you an expert opinion. Sometimes solar contractors can offer this as part of their free assessment. (Run on Sun works with a very reliable roofer who is happy to take a look at any roof in question!) If the roof still has some life left in it but not enough to outlast the solar system you could re-roof only the area where the solar array will cover and plan to do the rest later. An added benefit is that the solar panels will actually protect your roof from the elements, helping it to last longer.

 

Unfortunately, you will likely be able to find someone willing to put solar on your roof even if it isn’t a good candidate. But if they aren’t discussing the above issues with you, then red flags should be flying! To ensure you get the best investment possible, do your research, take a good long look at your roof, and discuss all of your concerns with your solar contractor. 

03/30/15

  06:21:00 pm, by Jim Jenal - Founder & CEO   , 566 words  
Categories: PWP Rebates, Commercial Solar, Residential Solar

Pasadena Solar Rebates Plummet!

Pasadena Water & Power (PWP) is about to slash its rebates by as much as 55% effective May 1 - the first rebate reduction in three years. Here are the details…

A Model of Stability

We have said it before and we will say it again, our hometown utility gets the highest marks for running the best, hands down, rebate program around.  Their folks are responsive, they have offered a consistent program since we got into this business, and their rebates have been among the highest offered in our service area.  The present rebate rates: $0.85/Watt for residential and small commercial, $1.60/Watt for small non-profit systems have been at that level since 2012 - even while system prices dropped by 25%.  (For large systems > 30 kW, the commercial rebate was 12.9¢/kWh of actual production paid over five years, while the non-profit version was 24.2¢/kWh.)

But all good things must end, including these great rebates - and they will, come May 1.

The Rates They are a Changin’

Money lost

The new rates are significantly less generous - $0.45/Watt for residential and small commercial, $0.90/Watt for small non-profit.  For larger systems the change is even more dramatic, with the rebate payout now only covering two years of production (instead of five) at the rate of 14.4¢/kWh for commercial and 28.8¢/kWh for non-profit.  (One bit of good news, the threshold for systems to be paid rebates over two years instead of at commissioning is going up from 30 kW to 100 kW.)

Leaving Money on the Table…

So what do these rebate reductions really mean?  Let’s look at a few examples.

Residential project - 5 kW

A typical residential project of 5 kW (AC) that submitted a rebate application before May 1 would secure a rebate worth $4,250 (as opposed to na da in SCE territory).  That same system will only receive a rebate of $2,250 - leaving an even $2,000 on the table.  Ouch!

Non-Profit project - 50 kW

A 50 kW non-profit project would earn, over the next five years, a rebate worth approximately $92,400.  But after May 1, only two years of payments will be made worth just $44,600 - a 52% reduction, leaving $47,850 blowin’ in the wind.  Double ouch!  The one side benefit, since this project is smaller than 100 kW (even though it is over the old, 30 kW threshold) it could qualify for the up-front rebate of approximately $39,200 at the time the system is commissioned - less money overall, but you get it faster.

Commercial project - 150 kW

A commercial project of 150 kW under today’s rebates would earn roughly $148,000 over five years, but for rebate applications submitted after May 1, that rebate drops to just $66,900, a reduction of 54.7% leaving nearly $81,000 waving bye-bye.  Brutal.

So… Don’t Just Sit There!

All is not lost, yet.  We still have a month and if you act RIGHT NOW you can still take advantage of the higher rebate rates!  To lock-in the higher rebate, we need to get your energy usage, do a site evaluation, send you a proposal, have you accept the proposal and sign a contract, and we need to get your rebate application on file before May 1.  (I feel a bit like our friends at KPCC - “we need 67 people to call in the next five minutes to meet this challenge…")  Yeah, that’s a fair amount of work in a short time, but if you jump on this opportunity, we can make it happen and you can save some serious money!  So don’t miss the boat…  Call us, or click on the “Let’s get started” link here to begin.

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Jim Jenal is the Founder & CEO of Run on Sun, Pasadena's premier installer and integrator of top-of-the-line solar power installations.
Laurel Hamilton is Run on Sun's Projects Coordinator, and together they author this blog.
Run on Sun also offers solar consulting services, working with consumers, utilities, and municipalities to help them make solar power affordable and reliable.

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